See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989)

Who else could play a deaf man, who witnessed a murder and a blind man, who heard it, other than two incomparable funnymen: the sensitive Gene Wilder and the bold Richard Pryor? It helps that—prior to Wilder turning down his role in the farce—each lead went to a special school—Wilder for the deaf and Pryor blind, respectively—in order to portray these challenges with accuracy. The script was then rewritten for them and their genuine chemistry is what breathes life into the slapstick.

Baby Driver (2017)

The very thing this gem has going for it is also its downfall, at least as far as marketing is concerned: its genre is unclassifiable. The closest comparison would be a musical, the likes of which have only been attempted during a few seconds of a TV ad. The score is the soundtrack is the playlist to which the main character listens throughout the movie. But rather than singing, choreography is the main draw. In fact, it’s practically a main character.

Everything from windshield wiper blades swiping to car doors slamming to gunshots firing is perfectly synched to the rhythm of the music. Be ready to immerse yourself in the story of a silent getaway driver the moment it starts (e.g. the lyrics of the opening song are visually incorporated into the scenery as graffiti, product labels, print ads, etc.). The style of this film is certainly clever but excellent acting coupled with the unique premise of unlikely partners in crime is what makes it thoroughly engaging.